Let’s make the right choices now to improve life for future generations.

“The Sustainable Development Report 2019 calls for six major transformations in every country to address skills and jobs, health, clean energy, biodiversity, land use, cities and digital technology. In 2015, world leaders agreed to 17 goals to ensure a better world by 2030. European countries, namely Denmark, Sweden, Finland, France and Austria, top the global chart, while Madagascar, Nigeria, Congo, Chad and the Central African Republic lag in the last places.

This places the issue among national priorities.

In 2015, world leaders agreed to 17 goals to ensure a better world by 2030. But we cannot do this alone.

In September 2015, United Nations member states adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. We support countries in achieving the SDGs through integrated solutions. Our track record working across the Goals provides us with a valuable experience and proven policy expertise to ensure we all reach the targets set out in the SDGs by 2030. That is why the SDGs are designed to bring the world to several life-changing ‘zeros’, including zero poverty, hunger, AIDS and discrimination against women and girls. Goal 13: Thailand is one of the countries with high vulnerability to the impact of climate change. The Agenda, to be achieved within 15 years, comprises 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with 169 specific targets and 230 indicators for measurement. What are the Sustainable Development Goals? It went on to report that new indicators, on trophic levels and yield gap closure, highlight where energy and agricultural efficiency can be strengthened to support a sustainable food supply while dealing with negative environmental, biodiversity and health impacts of diets. Achieving the SDGs requires the partnership of governments, private sector, civil society and citizens alike to make sure we leave a better planet for future generations.

United Nations Development Programme, Programme of Assistance to the Palestinian People. The Sustainable Development Goals, often called SDGs or Global Goals, provide clear guidelines and targets for all countries to adopt in accordance with their own development priorities.

It also reports that tolerance of poor labour standards in international supply chains harms the poor, and women in particular. Thailand ranks 40th in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Index 2019, moving up 19 places from 2018, according to a report, issued by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) and the Bertelsmann Stiftung. © Today’s complex challenges—from stemming the spread of disease to preventing conflict—cannot be tackled neatly in isolation. Ayutthaya Elephant Palace to be relocated for landscape improvement, Modified territorial defence course for students to be introduced in July, Suu Kyi’s party expected to win second term in Myanmar polls, Philippines orders evacuation as world’s strongest 2020 typhoon approaches, 3 dead, dozen missing after Typhoon Molave hit Philippines, Malaysia’s PM faces calls to quit after failed bid for emergency rule, Biden vows action on ‘day one’ to halt spiraling Covid crisis, Inthira and Tosaporn: Meet the young protesters’ celebrity ‘godparents’, Drag queen rides protest wave to push for LGBT rights. All countries have a big job ahead to create SDG roadmaps and strategies for success” says Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the SDSN.   The report is conducted by National Statistical Offices and international organizations to collect and standardize indicators to monitor the SDGs and is published annually since the United Nations launched the SDGs in 2016. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity by 2030. The creativity, knowhow, technology and financial resources from all of society is necessary to achieve the SDGs in every context. The content of the report derived from two processes: assessing progress and learning from communities. Everyone is needed to reach these ambitious targets. Asia and the Pacific SDG Progress Report 2019 Flagship 24 May 2019 This report analyses Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) trends as well as data availability for monitoring progress in Asia and the Pacific and its five subregions. The past year also saw the continuation of conflicts in many parts of the world, leading to reversals in SDG progress, while modern slavery and the share of waiting detainees in prison remain high, particularly in low-income countries, says the report, adding that trends in corruption and freedom of the press are worsening in over 50 countries, including several middle income and high-income countries. These goals are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. In mid and high income countries, rising income inequality and persisting gaps in access to services and opportunities by income or territorial area remain important policy issues.”. The 17 SDGs are integrated—that is, they recognize that action in one area will affect outcomes in others, and that development must balance social, economic and environmental sustainability. ... as well as various green labeling schemes to ensure the achievement of SDG 12. Find out what you can do to help achieve them. Through the pledge to Leave No One Behind, countries have committed to fast-track progress for those furthest behind first. As the lead UN development agency, UNDP is well-placed to help implement the Goals through our work in some 170 countries and territories. The report emphasised that “eradicating extreme poverty remains a global challenge with half of the world’s nations not on track to achieve SDG 1 (No Poverty). © Copyright 2018 Thai Public Broadcasting Service All rights reserved. In its media release, the SDSN reported that key findings of the report are that nations perform worst on SDG 13 (Climate Action), SDG 14 (Life Below Water) and SDG 15 (Life on Land), while no country obtains a “green rating” (the report’s indicator for the achievement of an SDG) on SDG 14 (Life Below Water) and that sustainable land use and healthy diets require integrated agriculture, climate and health policy interventions. Thailand ranks 40th out of 162 countries surveyed on development progress relating to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), moving up 19 places from last year, according to the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) and Bertelsmann Stiftung. Also, high-income countries generate high environmental and socioeconomic spillover effects, such as deforestation, as a result of palm oil and other fuel commodity demands, as well tax havens and banking secrecy that undermine a country’s ability to raise public revenue. 2020 UN Thailand | Welcome to the United Nations in Thailand. All countries have a big job ahead to create SDG roadmaps and strategies for success” says Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the SDSN. “The Sustainable Development Report 2019 calls for six major transformations in every country to address skills and jobs, health, clean energy, biodiversity, land use, cities and digital technology. The SDGs stress the importance of balancing the three dimensions of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental […] The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity by 2030. For UNDP, this means focusing on systems, root causes and connections between challenges—not just thematic sectors—to build solutions that respond to people’s daily realities.