A spokeswoman for OpenMedia, one of several consumer-oriented groups that speak out against Canada's large internet and wireless communications companies, said the report confirms that there's a systemic problem that should be fixed. The CRTC can’t let this be the end of the road. Get all the day's most vital news with our newsletter, sent every weekday. The CRTC's 2019 report noted that Rogers and Shaw had reported using secret shopper programs to evaluate their own retail sales force, but those observations weren't made public. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes, Get the latest from the Coast Reporter delivered to your inbox every week. It was created in 1976 when it took over responsibility for regulating telecommunication carriers. Black with Cattle Raisers Trading Co logo in blue/white Unstructured Plastic snap back

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes. More than 400 undercover shoppers evaluated six large wireless providers — BCE's Bell Canada, Rogers Communications, Telus, Shaw's Freedom, Quebecor's Videotron and SaskTel, which is owned by Saskatchewan's provincial government. The CRTC can’t let this be the end of the road. The release of the CRTC's first secret shoppers report was marred by some errors that were detected and pointed out on Twitter by a number of telecom watchers. The investigation included five days of testimony at public hearings in October and months of information gathering by the CRTC, which oversees Canada's mobile, internet and television service providers. Most of them were at one of the three national carriers: Bell (121), Rogers (133) and Telus (124). The investigation included five days of testimony at public hearings in October and months of information gathering by the CRTC, which oversees Canada's mobile, internet and television service providers. This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 29, 2020.

Business owners get FREE listings on GuidedBy.ca, A CRTC logo is shown in Montreal on September 10, 2012. David Paddon, The Canadian Press … The number of engagements was determined by market share. A CRTC logo is shown in Montreal on September 10, 2012. TORONTO — A "secret shopper" campaign on behalf of the CRTC found evidence of misleading or aggressive behaviour in about one-fifth of the interactions between its undercover shoppers and sales staff for six major wireless carriers. “The secret shopper project allowed us to gain on-the-ground insight into the challenges Canadians may face when engaging with communications service providers’ salespeople," CRTC chair Ian Scott said Tuesday in a statement. In 34 per cent of those situations, the salesperson didn't offer any helpful tips to address their concerns.

Canadians deserve better," OpenMedia executive director Laura Tribe said in an email after the report was issued. The CRTC is an independent public authority in charge of regulating and supervising Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications However, 13 per cent of shoppers felt that they were not given sufficient time to make an informed decision, and 11 per cent felt they were pressured by an employee to sign up or consider a product or service. However, it found that 20 per cent of shoppers felt they were given misleading information or faced aggressive sales practices — particularly if they had disabilities and or didn't use English or French as their first language. The secret shopper report was issued 20 months after the CRTC announced in February 2019 that it would embark on the program, one of several initiatives it planned to take as a result of an investigation into alleged misleading and aggressive practices.

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Most of them at one of the three national carriers: Bell (121), Rogers (133) and Telus (124). THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes A "secret shopper" campaign on behalf of the CRTC found evidence of … Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, Comisión canadiense de radiodifusión y telecomunicaciones, Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Crtc1.svg.

Your support is vital to helping us provide free local news. Original file ‎(SVG file, nominally 87 × 75 pixels, file size: 40 KB). The CRTC said in an email that the information was correct on all the charts in the report but some of the explanatory notes had flipped the Yes and No percentages, until the problem was corrected and the website was updated later Tuesday. In addition, salespeople attended to downplay concerns expressed by shoppers, such as overage fees, in 20 per cent of the cases.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes TORONTO — A "secret shopper" campaign on behalf of the CRTC found evidence of misleading or aggressive behaviour in about one-fifth of the interactions between its undercover shoppers and sales staff for six major wireless carriers. A CRTC logo is shown in Montreal on September 10, 2012. Commons is a freely licensed media file repository. We look forward to using this information to promote the fair treatment of consumers.". We look forward to using this information to promote the fair treatment of consumers.”. A spokeswoman for OpenMedia, one of several consumer-oriented groups that speak out against Canada's large internet and wireless communications companies, said the report confirms that there's a systemic problem that should be fixed. "This is why the secret shopper project will continue into the future. "What this report completely fails to do however, is provide any path forward to improvement. Canadians deserve better," OpenMedia executive director Laura Tribe said in an email after the report was issued. If the file has been modified from its original state, some details may not fully reflect the modified file. The CRTC's first secret shopper report was issued 20 months after the CRTC announced in February 2019 that it would embark on the program, one of several initiatives it planned to take as a result of an investigation into alleged misleading and aggressive practices.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC; French: Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes) is a public organization in Canada with mandate as a regulatory agency for broadcasting and telecommunications. This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. Size of this PNG preview of this SVG file: Add a one-line explanation of what this file represents. About half the contacts (53 per cent) were in stores and the rest were split evenly between online and phone channels.

A "secret shopper" campaign on behalf of the CRTC found evidence of misleading or aggressive behaviour in about one-fifth of the interactions between its undercover shoppers and sales staff for six major wireless carriers.

However, it found that 20 per cent of shoppers felt they were given misleading information or faced aggressive sales practices — particularly if they had disabilities and or didn't use English or French as their first language. "This is why the secret shopper project will continue into the future.

A CRTC logo is shown in Montreal on September 10, 2012. Commons is a freely licensed media file repository. One of the report's key findings, according to the CRTC, was that 88 per cent of shoppers overall indicated that the information they were provided was clear and simple to understand.